The Grand Arrival: Mahalaya

The Grand Arrival: Mahalaya

Somewhere in the wee hours of dawn, when the night melts into the first blues and saffrons of daylight, Birendra Krishna Bhadra starts his litany about the goddess’s arrival.

 

In a city that boasts so much life at every given moment of any day, listen to Bhadra’s magnanimous voice on any other day of the year, and you’ll feel no warmth, no goosebumps that wake something up in you, perhaps, you will feel nothing.

 

And then, come the morning of Mahalaya, the same voice arouses something from the very depths of your soul, and no matter how indifferent you are about Durga Pujo, you cannot help the warmth in your bones, the nostalgia tangible in innocent childhood memories, of waking up to the usually unnoticed radio being tuned to the right frequency by your father, or the one where the Bengali channels begin with a rather long show about how Devi Durga defeated the evil Mahisasur, how she became Mahisasurmardini.

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Mahalaya mornings shall never be complete without catching an early show of the most potboiler presentation of Mahisasurmardini, filled with its horrible special effects and laughable depictions of the gods. (© Image from Google Images)

The story is simple, really. Without bludgeoning you with a thousand details, it goes something on the following lines. A megalomaniac Asura (demon), Mahisasur, wanted nothing more than to rule Swarg (Heaven), Morto (Earth) and Patal (Underworld, not to be confused with Narak, which is Hell). Armed with his glorious ambition, he committed himself to years of Tapasya (meditation) towards the Lord and All-Father Brahma (think, Odin, the Norse god, only stupider and with far less insight about the future, although Brahma is the god of all that is existent and non-existent). Some information here, no one talks about the severe concentration capabilities of Mahisasur, but honestly, it deserves admiration, because, hell (pun intended), I for one cannot even concentrate in a two-hour exam.

 

So, finally, after years and years of austerities, in which Urvashi (the greatest dancer in the heavens) herself came down to seduce Mahisasur and break his concentration, albeit in a futile effort, Brahma finally came to the earthen soils to grant him a wish. And, of course, in spite of achieving infinite knowledge, Mahisasur jumped the gun and asked for a simple wish—“Make me immortal. No man or animal shall ever be able to slay me.”

 

Of course Brahma, being the brilliant philanthropist, granted him the wish, and soon the tyranny of Mahisasur began, as he went terrorizing the gods (Devata) and mortals alike and conquered the earth, the heavens and the underworld with his huge Asura army. Helpless and ousted of their home, the Devatas (something which, in every story of the Hindu myths, you will find the gods, especially Indra, of being) fled to Mount Kailash, where the dude of all gods, the ganja-smoking Shiva resides. Somehow breaking his tapasya (let’s be real, he was just high and tripping on the weed he was smoking), the gods begged the divine ascetic for a solution. Also an information here, although the Hindu pantheon consists of the Devatas, who are basically divine royalty, the real power lies in the trifecta: Brahma, Vishnu and Maheswar (Shiva).

 

So, in this divine conference, where Vishnu and Brahma also come by, and Parvati, Shiva’s wife, is also listening, they discuss about the tyranny of Mahisasur. Finally, Vishnu (who I suspect is the biological father of Tyrion Lannister for his brilliant diplomatic skills) finds a fatal loophole in the wish. You see, Mahisasur mentioned he cannot be killed by any man or animal, but he never said anything about a woman, right? Depend on Vishnu to target on the insidious sexism of most power-hungry folks in the Hindu myths. Using that, the divine trifecta channel their greatest energies into creating a source of ultimate feminine energy, something which is called Shakti, or power. Now, Shakti, in spite of being a source of infinite energy, cannot exist freely, or it shall ravage all known universe. So, Parvati becomes the savior of the day, and accepts this infinite energy source, and becomes the incarnation of Shakti, ergo Durga, herself.

 

In Sanskrit, Durga essentially means that which is invincible or inaccessible. However, the same can be interpreted as one who destroys all durgoti, which means danger or harm. Combining the two, Durga, the ten-handed, three-eyed, trident-wielding incarnation of Parvati, is a symbolic representation of goodness, infinite energy, feminine power, a universal mother and the lesser known concept of the state of motion. The last bit can be explained in the following way: Shiva, Parvati’s consort, is the state of asceticism, mysticism, stability, and rest, and on the flipside, Durga is the state of motion, of uncontrollable power and an All-Mother, hence, Maa Durga.

 

Now, armed with several weapons in her ten hands, from the Sudarshan Chakra of Vishnu to the Trident of Shiva, she mounts on her vahana, the king of the forests, a lion, and rides off to battle Mahisasur. She calls for war with Brahma’s conch and razes his armies first, destroying all that stands in her way with her mace, her sword, and her bow and arrows. Then she begins her one-on-one battle with Mahisasur, who of course underestimates her for her sex (how stupid can he really be?). This battle marks the perennial battle between good and evil, between light and dark, between day and night, between dharma and adharma, and rages until the end of Time. Durga battles the shape-shifting Mahisasur in several incarnations, from the darkness-removing Kali to the blood-consuming Chandi, and finally, she defeats him when she is in the form of Devi Durga, or Adi Shakti, the incarnation of light, as she stabs him in the heart with her trident (as Arya Stark would say, “Stick ’em with the pointy end”).

 

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Chakyudaan: The ritual of painting the goddess’s eyes on Mahalaya (© Image from Google Images)

But the big question lies, what exactly is Mahalaya? The direct translation of the word from Sanskrit literally means grand arrival. On that note, Mahalaya is essentially the onset of the hour of the goddess, something called Devi Paksha, and the end of Pitri Paksha, the hour of the father. It is in this period of time that Durga Pujo occurs in the city, and Kolkata dresses herself up to welcome her beloved daughter home.

In spite of being considered the universal mother around India, West Bengal stands as the one exception to this rule, where the residents of Kolkata consider Durga as their daughter, who comes to visit her baaper bari (father’s home) with her adorable brood of children, Ganesh, Lakshmi, Saraswati and Karthik, from Kailash. And so, the celebrations begin, there are smiles stuck on the lips of the young and old, and food seems to overflow in every corner of the city.

 

But on this day, on Mahalaya, the final austerity of idol making is done, when the eyes of the goddess is drawn as Devi Paksha sets in, a ritual called Chakyudaan. In the heart of the city, at Kumortuli, where thousands of idols are made every year, several sculptors busily paint the three eyes of the goddess, their art and their passion pushing them to give life to an earthen mass of a woman.

And suddenly, the corny ads on the television and radio do not feel so out of place anymore, the silly GIFs sent on WhatsApp from your older family members bring a foolish smile on your lips, the videos that are shared and re-shared on Facebook does not make you think that they are spamming your newsfeed, the sound of dhaak seems like it belongs right here, here in the City of Joy, and the shopping bags filled with meters of shapeless cloth, from sarees to churidar pieces, do not feel so heavy in your arms. Suddenly, the world appears a bit more colorful, like seeing the city with rose-tinted eyes and in high definition, and everything is so very alive, like our home breathes in happiness.

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Kash Phool (wild sugarcane grass flowers), the symbol of Mahalaya and the Indian autumn or Sarat Kaal (© Image from Google Images)

Because, you see, you feel, and you know that she is here, and she will color your home, your soul, with smiles and delectable sweets and recipes. She will not judge if you steal a bit of sweetmeat from the platter, and she will definitely not rain hell upon your soul if you dare eat meat as the city celebrates in full galore. For we Bangalis, we don’t just pray to an unattainable goddess. Instead, we celebrate the homecoming of our beloved daughter. And right now, she is home, and so are you.

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For Whom Does the Goddess Arrive?

For Whom Does the Goddess Arrive?

When I was a child, Durga Pujo did not come with calender dates, not really. It came when suddenly in the middle of a dreary September, the first bamboos were hoisted by the workers, a sign that the pandals would arrive soon enough, when the huge advertisement billboards of innumerable brands were strung up all around the city, from shampoo to food, when the first issues of Anandomela and Anandolok came to fill up the entirety of the newspaper and magazine shops in the streets.

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When I was a child, Durga came with the last half-day at school before the holidays came ringing in, she came when the last pages of the mid-term exams were submitted to a solemn class teacher, she came when my friends and I half-heartedly trudged towards school to attend the compulsory last day on Panchami.

 

When I was a child, Pujo came with bittersweet happiness, with silent excitement, with innocence not yet lost.

 

If someone would have told me then, that the goddess would be strung up in the city, bartered in the name of religion, and questioned for her affiliations, I would have looked at that person with a blank look of astonishment.

 

When I was a child, my next-door neighbor and resident best friend in the locality was a Muslim girl of my age who would always accompany me, along with her little brother, as my father took all of us to buy the endless paraphernalia required to dress ourselves with in the Pujo.

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And then, after the odyssey of shopping was finally completed, my sister and I would curl up with an issue of Anandomela and laugh her heads off as the different caricatures of the goddess with her brood of children colored the pages of the magazine, portraying her as she begun her southward journey from Mt Kailash.

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There used to be so many colors then, the goddess traveling on a water jet with her children, her son Karthik obviously standing like a king on the deck, pictures of the divine family ready to celebrate Pujo with guitars, drums and cellos, and even some where her husband Shiva would come to drop the family off on his bike. I remember how those evenings were the best part of pining and waiting for the Pujo days to arrive, the days where I was excruciatingly excited to wear my new dresses, munch on every unhealthy street food I could get my hands upon, and see as many idols in the pandals as possible.

 

And then there were the newspapers of course, when come the morning of Panchami, the incredibly long list of pandals around the city was published by Anandobazar Patrika, and my sister and I would stoop over, red sharpie gripped on hand, marking which pandals we would be visiting in the coming days, my mother of course muttering something along the lines of how her hooligan children would eat till their stomachs burst.

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But now, the sounds have departed, the smiles have become cajoling diversions and the warmth in the embraces have long left our limbs. Because, somehow, somewhere, someone asked the question: Who does the goddess come for?

 

Is Durga for us Hindus, is she for the Muslims, or is she for the Christians? If she is a Hindu goddess, why does the Muslim children in our localities buy clothes that are assorted for Ashtami and Nabami still? Why do the younglings still visit Bow Barracks and Park Street and gaze at the glittering evening lights? Pardon my french, but why the hell does Chetla Agroni Sangha and Mohammad Ali Park are still allowed to host their own Durga Pujo, when clearly the leader of one community is a Muslim man and the other is named after a Muslim himself? After all, as someone says, Durga is a Hindu goddess.

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So why, I ask, rather plaintively, does Mr Jawed Habib dare to have the audacity of insulting our Hindu goddess in his marketing campaign, and produce a caricature where the goddess and her children are happily getting ready for the Pujo? Why is Durga allowed to wait while Karthik gets a facial and Ganesh a pedicure? After all, Mr Habib is a consumer of beef, a Muslim, a criminal, an utter disgrace to all us great Hindus and their exalted goddess. He should never be allowed to commit the blasphemy of so much raising an eye to our Hindu goddess.

 

I am a sinner too. You see, I have been going to his chain of parlors for the last decade. I started out as a silly brat at fourteen who wanted nothing more than the long flowing tresses of our Hindu goddess and now I actually do have that hair, all thanks to the years of undying persistence of my favorite hair stylist in the parlor. I remember the number of times I broke bread in the shop of this Muslim man, the number of times I drank his water, the number of times I visited every new branch that cropped up in Calcutta during their grand openings.

Furthermore, I remember one of my father’s closest friends, a tailor in the heart of Metiaburuz, a Muslim man, I confess, who would send the most beautiful bunch of colorful frocks for my sister and me, every year, a man who would send the most delectable shimui as his blessings for Eid, and how his son, a man I grew up calling my brother, would come to bless us during Pujo, break bread with us once the austerities were over with the prosad our family cooked for our 150-year-old Durga Pujo. I remember how beautiful his wife, my boudi, had looked when on one year, my mother had lovingly colored her cheeks with sindhur (vermilion) during the last hours of Dashami.

 

And yet, no one in my family, not my loving father, not my usually strict mother and definitely not my crazy-as-the-Mad-Hatter sister told me that I was a sinner. No one told me that Kaku or Dada were Muslim, untouchable, unwelcome, and somehow, I grew up considering them just as we were, humans.

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Perhaps that was my childish foolishness, but in a world where goddesses are cut open, their intestines spilled out to see the color of their blood and count the faithfuls they cater to, maybe the opinion of a child is the only thing that can save us all.

 

And maybe, just maybe, Durga is not a Hindu goddess, maybe her brood of adorable children are not only for the ones who pray to cows, maybe she is for all of us, for our families, our friends, our acquaintances, and even our rivals. Maybe, just maybe, Durga is for every Bangali across the globe. Just think, what a beautiful world that would be.

 

The Curious Case of Durga Pujo

The Curious Case of Durga Pujo

In my ruefully nondescript twenty and three years of life, I have spent exactly twenty and two of it in the city of Calcutta. Yes, she may call herself Kolkata, but until my dying breath, she will always be Calcutta to me.

 

I studied in this city, I played in this city, I fell in love in this city, and I got my heart broken in this city. And amidst all of that, I breathed, I loved and I lived in this city. And after years of living, loving, existing and sometimes, hating this city, I find myself inexplicably attracted to every one of her oddities during the months of September–October, when this city dresses herself in the prettiest lights, the highest pandals, and the most colorfully dressed citizens to welcome the Goddess Durga.

 

Every year I decide that this is it, this is where it ends, this is where I no longer feel the cravings and aches of wanting Pujo to come faster, of the notes of Birendra Krishna Bhadra to stop affecting me physically, with the head tingles and the goosebumps and wanting to wake up at 4 AM, all to hear a now-dead man sing about a goddess who is portrayed in the most pot-boiler depictions in certain Bengali TV channels, not to mention the abominable special effects. And every year, I happily accept my defeat.

 

Because when September comes, the city wakes me up from my haze of just passing through life to actually live it instead. And in spite of myself, every year, I break the promise that I will not buy expensive new clothes, NO SIR.

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The War for the Best Saree

Here is how it starts: My parents abduct me from the safe haven of my beloved cafe (where I sit confessing my sins at the moment, the tea, I assure you, is no balm to my newest wounds) and whisk me away to the most beautiful saree shop you can ever hope to imagine. And by beauty, I definitely do not mean that it appears grand like some Chanel or Gucci showroom. I am talking about a four-storeyed building that is jam packed with people to the extent that if you are kneed in your gut (or unfortunately, a little lower) and ask for an apology, they will knee you some more, this time, definitely a little lower.

 

But in spite of that fresh hell (god help you if you are claustrophobic), shopping during Durga Pujo has its own adrenaline rush. The colors, the feel of the cloth in your hand, the way some Katan Silk sarees melt their purples into the green, like a swift shadow-play of colors solely done by thread, they seduce you. And by the time you are shamefully walking off to the billing counter, your wallet about to be butchered and your self-control already dead and done with, you cannot help that absolutely gobsmacked shit-eating grin that basically interprets into something like this — “YES! HELL YES! I got that Dhakai Jamdani saree that I am so wearing in Sandhi Pujo during Ashtami (the eighth and most glorious day of the Pujo) and making that really cute boy in my para (locality) swoon over me.”

 

And when that adrenaline rush has fallen and the regrets set in, your hands still weighing down with the weight of your wrong decisions that take the form of around four to five ridiculously expensive six meters worth of cloth, the city hypnotizes you with her evening lights, the unfinished pandals where the men toil day and night to finish the temporary buildings on time and with the by-lanes of Kumortuli where the most beautiful clay idols of the goddess are colored the brightest shades of yellow and red, the eyes still left unpainted, waiting for the tithi (time) of Mahalaya.

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An Unfinished Portrait of the Goddess as a Young Woman

And then, Mahalaya comes, Devi Paksha sets in. For years, I myself was no expert in the meaning of such terms, in spite of the 150-year-old Durga Puja that is celebrated every year in my home. I remember in my adolescence, when the word of the most popular student in the class meant holier than the Bible, I hid my belonging, my love for such ridiculous austerities. After all, who would ever want to wake up at five in the morning, only to go all the way to the Ganges banks to bathe a banana tree (Kola Bou, the consort of Durga’s favorite son, Ganesh) and then take a dip in the freezing river? Let me tell you the answer: surprisingly, almost everyone.

 

However, coming back to Mahalaya and Devi Paksha, it essentially means that the hour of the goddess has officially arrived, and the beautiful lady has started her south-bound journey towards her baaper bari (father’s house) from Kailash. Also, before you ask me how she survives in the freezing cold with a husband who is only into tiger prints, marijuana and being partially naked, let me remind you that none of you had any qualms in believing in the dragons of a certain Khaleesi, and let me assure you, Durga is way “cooler”.

 

And so your regrets wash away, like ink on water, and you cannot help the certain sprightly beat on your steps when you look up to the cloudless skies and the somehow softer sunlight skimming through your skin, making you yellow as the goddess herself. The radio channels swing from ‘Dhitang Dhitang Bole’ to ‘E Ki Labanye Purno Prana’ and that little tap on your feet makes you smile a little brighter, feel your head a little lighter, and there is love, love . . . and so much love.

 

Then the Pujo actually arrives, your house bustles with relatives you wouldn’t want to even glimpse upon the rest of the year, and suddenly the crowd is tolerable, the noise almost lovable, and you question whether this is even you. And it is you, oh so much you, only with the extra “muchness” that the Mad Hatter had promised about little Alice. And you are suddenly mad, happy, ecstatic, and you are flinging through the bazillion dresses and sarees and you have to find the right bangles and earrings with that particular shade of red Dhakai Jamdani, and yet, all is well. I promise.

 

So you set off, there are smiles in the lips of your friends, your hands are entwined and you are laughing at the oddity of being children at twenty-three. Why else would your fingers be so warmly clasped on that of the old friend you haven’t seen in such a long while? The one who had not replied to your mails, the one who had not given a shoulder for you to cry upon when the distance between the both of you become all too much. And even the rivals seem bearable, and suddenly, all you wish is to smile, and definitely gorge on the ounces of mishti doi, jalebi and jhal muri.

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The Seduction of Twisted Jalebis © Copyright of Google Images

And as Ashtami sets in, that cute boy in the para comes out, but oh! What do we have there? That quintessentially weird and silent boy in the para whom you have always kept a distance from seems ridiculously gorgeous in that black Panjabi and white Pajama. Also, brownie points for settling that roving eye on Mr. Silent Weirdo while his hands are filled with bits of that annoying genda phool and hibiscus, while bits of bel pata sprout out, seemingly out of nowhere, as he waits for his turn at the Ashtami Anjali. Well, you cannot help but settle that anchaal of your aat-poure a little softly on your shoulders, and squeeze into a tiny space beside him. Oh, young love, whatever would we do without you?

 

The food suddenly tastes better, I assure you, it does. Kaka’s cha is a little too sweet, but you don’t mind, not at all, especially when you see the teenagers are having at their first puff of a cigarette, coughing and spluttering the tea all over themselves. And you cannot help but laugh, because almost a decade ago, that was you. And you remember that same deer-caught-in-the-headlights jittery movements that they have, because what if paasher barir Kakima (the neighborhood aunty) sees you while you smoke?!

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The All-Encumbering Delight of a Bhaar of Mishti Doi © Copyright of Google Images

So you must remove the stench of the nicotine from your mouth, and don’t forget, from your clothes too. Also, you need food, because when are you ever not hungry when Pujo is here? Blame the atrocity of available food everywhere, here is the smell of biriyani, and just a little further, the stinging sound when the besan of jalebi hits the scalding wok of oil, enslaving you in their seductive clutches. And you stride off, friends in toe, because what better excuse is there than removing the scent of smoke in order to spend a ridiculous amount of money on that cafe/restaurant you have been eyeing for months? We all know the little lie, your friends know too, and you are all smiling and laughing at your shared idiocy, but right now, everything is perfect.

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A Mouthful of Happiness © Copyright of Google Images

Yet, moments accumulate into hours and hours into days, and suddenly you realize time has slipped by, and Dashami awaits at your doors. The goddess must leave, it is time to say goodbye, and your heart hurts, hurts because you are now too old to say that it is broken. So you smile, your lips do tremble, and the others see and un-see it just the same. Because everyone shares your brokenness when the sandesh has been stuffed to the goddess’s clay mouth, only to leave a bittersweet aftertaste before you bid her goodbye. You sit beside your mother, your sister, your father, your family, and you see the watery eyes of the goddess in the reflections of a darpan (mirror) on water, and in that minute, you know that she knows, and she is sad too, but it is alright, I promise it is, because she will come home again.

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“Ashche Bochor Abar Hobe!” (“It will happen again in the coming year!”) © Copyright of Google Images

So you rise up, you take that container of sindur (vermilion) and color the cheeks of every friend you find, and you are all smiling, laughing, sharing sorrows in the veils of joy, and when the goddess is immersed into the waters (bisharjan), her beautiful clay face slowly loosing its color to the waves, you know you will be alright. Because in this moment, you have found your home.

 

 

 

 

Please, Not Seventeen Anymore

Please, Not Seventeen Anymore

I knew I was old when Daddy didn’t come to braid my hair and tell me stories anymore.

Sometimes I want to be twelve again.

I don’t want my chest to feel heavy, my spine to ache with the weight of my bosom.

I don’t want to feel dirty when a man brushes across me in the busy streets of my city, his elbow touching the edge of my breasts.

I don’t want to keep scrubbing my nipples underneath the shower, my tears blinding me, hoping this water would brush away that touch, that filth of unwanted warmth off my skin.

I wish, oh I fucking wish.

I don’t want to be seventeen anymore.

I want to wake up, still praying to be seventeen on my twelfth birthday, my father braiding my hair.

I don’t want to feel like his mouth still persists on me after he has kissed my cheek.

I don’t want to flinch when someone wishes to hold my hand, to touch me.

I want to wake up, and forget my dreams.

I want to wake up, stop dreaming anymore.

My Daddy stopped braiding my hair when I was seventeen and I shivered when he touched my curls.

He told me I was a woman grown, and now I needed only to touch myself, and no one else.

I was a woman grown, a dirty thing, a filthy thing, a glorious thing?

I am seventeen and I am nothing more than a rant, a word, a hope, a joke.

I am my hair, my skin, my breasts, my cunt, myself and still not me.

I am my heart, my lungs, my dreams, my soul and never again anything that used to be me.

I am a woman, I am a female, I am a goddess, I am a whore, I am a mother, but then again, could I be so much more?

I am the universe,

And I am just an atom.

I am starlight,

And I am also the street light whose shadow you find to take a piss.

I am me,

And I am nothing, everything, something, anything.

I am me, you, but not that seventeen-year-old.

I am fallen leaves, rotting flowers strewn upon puddles, and the cracked barks of trees.

I am the last colors of a forgotten rainbow, the scent of jasmine, and the taste of the first plum you bite into.

I am the first steaming sip of hot chocolate, and the last kiss goodnight on a wintry evening.

I am the rain, hail, sleet and snow, I am soggy letters, and smudged secrets.

I am everything, but not that seventeen-year-old.

I am a child, I am a woman, but I promise, oh I fucking promise you, I am still so much more.

Of Stray Leaves and Crumpled Pages

Of Stray Leaves and Crumpled Pages

I should say your name.

But then again, what’s in a name? Right? Wrong.

When all is said and done, the sound of a name, the stray odour of a forgotten love story, the quiver in a pair of lips as the past thwarts in between, the littlest things begin to matter. You become a miniaturist.

So, hello Old Love,

I have come to your doorstep. I have some words to say. And perhaps I shouldn’t call you ‘love’, when the story I started was left unfinished. For a minute there, I want to take my pen, draw a line in between a page, make a border between you and me, and write the reasons why we remained unfinished.

For a minute, I want to do the ordinary thing. Because ordinariness is safe. Because predictability is home.

But when you a have a stark-white page that peers into your soul, sometimes, just sometimes, you want to do something extraordinary.

And so you scribble. You cut, you write, you bleed, you melt, and then, you become words. There is no red pen in the corner of my page anymore. I won’t correct my words. I won’t look back and see the mistakes I have made. After all, I never did that for you.

So let the words hold flaws. For even love, as beautiful as it often is, is flawed. I used to see that beauty. Now, I just remind myself to smile again.

There are the nights though, deep into the bosom of darkness, when I let myself fall a little more than I would let myself in the transparency of daytime.

When I would curl up in my bed, my pillow in my arms, and I would close my eyes. And I would see you. I would see us. Perhaps you and I would smile. Do the most ordinary things, sit for a breakfast, or I would throw a stray piece of paper at you, with its undiscovered trove of words inside. In my fantasies, there is always daylight. And maybe that is enough to make me remember that I have drifted a little further off from reality.

I would bleed tears after, or words instead. I have come to love the words more now. You see, when dawn cracks into the night, light filtering into my room, I like to be reminded it was never a dream.

Seasons change me the most, though.

Summer colours, the yellows and the oranges, the purple hues in the dying hearts of sunsets at riversides, and the slows kisses in winter, azure and purple playing with one another, until the sky itself becomes a confused infinity of grey. It is beautiful, oh so, beautiful, that it almost breaks my heart.

I lose my track often, as I do now. I write to you, and instead I lose myself in the montages of unmade memories. It is a new habit I have developed, to love things that are incomplete, unmade, forgotten, abandoned. Fallen leaves, crushed flowers, crumpled papers, broken quill nibs, I find a strange love for them, growing each day inside of me.

And in loving them, I, too, fall into pieces, brokenness and halfhearted remembrance lingering as effigies.

 

There should be an end here. According to the laws of words, I should scribble lies with ‘yours lovingly’ or ‘yours forever’. But I am mine, only mine. I collect all these fallen pieces of me, stick them with glue and watch them break away again. But there are still all mine.

So until I find some of me to share with you, in fantasy or in reality,

Farewell.